Search for content, post, videos

Alligator Bioscience enters research collaboration

Malin Carlsson Alligator

Alligator Bioscience has entered into a joint research collaboration with MacroGenics to develop novel immunotherapy.

The research collaboration will lead to the expansion of Alligator’s patient specific immunotherapy Neo-X-Prime by incorporating MacroGenics’ DART and TRIDENT multi-specific platforms against two undisclosed targets, reveals the company in a press release.

“The aim is to create a drug candidate that takes advantage of a unique mechanism of a patient’s own immune system to fight cancer.”

Under the joint research collaboration agreement, which covers activities from candidate drug generation up until IND-enabling studies, each company will be responsible for its own costs. The parties may continue further development of the resulting bispecific molecule under a separate co-development collaboration and licensing agreement, they state.

“We are truly excited to start this collaboration with MacroGenics, validating the Neo-X-Prime drug concept. The aim is to create a drug candidate that takes advantage of a unique mechanism of a patient’s own immune system to fight cancer. We look forward to working collaboratively to expand the Neo-X-Prime concept with MacroGenics’ antibodies, their proven DART technology, and extensive capabilities,” says Malin Carlsson, interim CEO of Alligator Bioscience.

Neo-X-Prime

Neo-X-Prime is a drug concept for more personalized immunotherapy, launched by Alligator in 2020. The concept builds on bispecific antibodies that physically link circulating tumor material to the immune system, to allow neoantigen-specific T cell priming with potential for superior anti-tumor efficacy.

DART and TRIDENT

MacroGenics’ DART and TRIDENT multi-specific platforms enable the creation of potential medicines comprised of a single molecule designed to simultaneously bind to two or more targets, each with antibody-like specificity, with the goal of creating a more significant biological effect.

Photo of Malin Carlsson: Alligator Bioscience