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FDA approval for Genmab’s Darzalex in combination with Bortezomib, Thalidomide and Dexamethasone

FDA approved

Genmab has announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved the use of DARZALEX (daratumumab) in combination with bortezomib, thalidomide and dexamethasone (VTd) as treatment for patients newly diagnosed with multiple myeloma who are eligible for autologous stem cell transplant (ASCT).

The supplemental Biologics License Application (sBLA) for this indication was submitted by Genmab’s licensing partner, Janssen Biotech in March 2019. The U.S. FDA subsequently granted priority review to the sBLA, with a Prescription Drug User Fee Act (PDUFA) target date of September 26, 2019. In August 2012, Genmab granted Janssen Biotech, Inc. an exclusive worldwide license to develop, manufacture and commercialize daratumumab.

Phase III CASSIOPEIA study

The approval was based on data from part one of the Phase III CASSIOPEIA study of daratumumab in combination with VTd as treatment for patients newly diagnosed with multiple myeloma who are candidates for ASCT. The study is sponsored by the French Intergroupe Francophone du Myelome (IFM) in collaboration with the Dutch-Belgian Cooperative Trial Group for Hematology Oncology (HOVON) and Janssen.

“Today’s approval is an important step forward for patients with multiple myeloma. There are now three different treatment combinations that include DARZALEX for patients newly diagnosed with multiple myeloma, whether they are eligible for ASCT or not. We are grateful for the efforts of the IMF, HOVON and Janssen that led to the strong data from the CASSIOPEIA trial, which formed the basis of this new approval,” said Jan van de Winkel, Ph.D., Chief Executive Officer of Genmab.

About the CASSIOPEIA (MMY3006) study

This Phase III study is a randomized, open-label, multicenter study, run by the French Intergroupe Francophone du Myelome (IFM) in collaboration with the Dutch-Belgian Cooperative Trial Group for Hematology Oncology (HOVON) and Janssen, including 1,085 newly diagnosed patients with previously untreated symptomatic multiple myeloma who are eligible for high dose chemotherapy and stem cell transplant. In the first part of the study, patients were randomized to receive induction and consolidation treatment with daratumumab combined with bortezomib, thalidomide (an immunomodulatory agent) and dexamethasone (a corticosteroid) or bortezomib, thalidomide and dexamethasone alone. The primary endpoint is the proportion of patients that achieve a stringent Complete Response (sCR). In the second part of the study (currently ongoing), patients that achieved a response will undergo a second randomization to either receive maintenance treatment of daratumumab 16 mg/kg every 8 weeks for up to 2 years versus no further treatment (observation). The primary endpoint of this part of the study is progression free survival (PFS).

Photo of Jan van de Winkel: Genmab