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Oncopeptides selects first candidate drug from its SPiKE platform

Oncopeptides has announced that the first candidate drug based on the company’s platform for Small Polypeptide based innate Killer Engagers (SPiKE) has been selected.

The SPiKE platform uses multi-specific constructs, able to bind to multiple targets simultaneously. The first drug candidate, OPSP1, is a bi-specific construct designed to both engage natural killer cells, a type of immune cell, and target cancer cells. The goal of OPSP1 is to prove the ability of the SPiKE platform to activate these natural killer cells. To do this, OPSP1 targets a specific protein called BCMA that is expressed in some cancers including multiple myeloma. By targeting this protein, Oncopeptides will be able to assess how well the SPiKE platform can activate natural killer cells to fight cancer, a crucial step before continued clinical development of the SPiKE platform.

NK cell-mediated therapy represents a promising avenue in cancer immunotherapy, with ongoing research aimed at overcoming existing challenges and enhancing its therapeutic potential. As a next step for Oncopeptides, a first-in-human clinical trial will be designed to evaluate the safety, efficacy, and overall therapeutic potential of OPSP1.

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Following the accomplishments we have seen with our first technology platform PDC, where we have an approved product, we are excited to also announce progress with SPiKE, our second technology platform.”

“The ability to show a promising product pipeline behind its flagship product is important for a growing biotech company. Following the accomplishments we have seen with our first technology platform PDC, where we have an approved product, we are excited to also announce progress with SPiKE, our second technology platform,” says Sofia Heigis, CEO of Oncopeptides. “This milestone is a major step forward in our ambition to ensure that Oncopeptides can continue to provide hope for patients suffering from difficult-to-treat cancers, and value to shareholders investing in our science.”

Photo of Sofia Heigis: Oncopeptides

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