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These are the winners of the Global Image of the Year Award

Evident has unveiled the winners of its third Global Image of the Year Life Science Light Microscopy Award, an annual competition that recognizes the best in life science imaging.

The contest launched on Oct. 19, 2021, with a call for users to submit their best life science microscopy images through Jan. 31, 2022. All entries were evaluated on artistic and visual aspects, scientific impact and microscope proficiency. The winners were selected from nearly 800 images submitted from 49 countries around the world.

From flowers to fungus and ferns, the Evident Life Science team was impressed by the fascinating specimens masterfully captured under the microscope.

“I continue to be amazed by the creative images we see each year that turn life under the microscope into unique art pieces,” said Satoshi Nakamura, Vice President of Scientific Solutions Global Marketing at Evident. “We are honored to receive so many stunning captures from around the world that visually blend artistic creativity and science. The winning images create a beautiful image gallery showcasing an incredible level of talent and technique at the microscope.”

Global Winner – Jan Martinek

Jan Martinek from the Czech Republic was selected as the global winner for a glowing image of an Arabidopsis thaliana flower with pollen tubes growing through the pistil. The flower tissues were chemically cleared to reveal the pollen tubes stained with aniline blue (yellow fluorescence). Martinek chose to image this flower to highlight the beauty of science in plant cell research.

“Plants are fascinating and beautiful on all levels of magnification, from the level of ecosystems to the level of individual cells,” Martinek explained. “As a plant cell biologist, I spend hours looking at plants under the microscope. I see a lot of beautiful images, like this flower of Arabidopsis thaliana with pollen tubes growing through the pistil to fertilize the ovules. However, I capture hundreds of pictures like this just to measure the lengths of the pollen tubes, and readers of my research articles will see only some boxplots comparing the pollination efficiency of different mutants. I share these pictures on my social media for fellow scientists and the general public to enjoy the beauty of science, which sometimes stays hidden behind the statistically significant results. I am happy that thanks to the IOTY Award, my and others’ pictures of this fascinating microcosm get worldwide attention.”

Martinek will receive the grand prize, an Olympus SZX7 stereo microscope with a DP28 digital camera.

 

The global winning image was taken by Jan Martinek (Czech Republic). Arabidopsis thaliana flower with pollen tubes growing through the pistil. The flower tissues were chemically cleared to become transparent, while the pollen tubes were stained with aniline blue (yellow fluorescence) in order to be seen.

 

Regional Winners

Three regional prizes were awarded to Vasilis Kokkoris (the Netherlands) for EMEA, Ivan Radin (USA) for the Americas and Daniel Han (Australia) for Asia. Each regional winner will receive an Olympus CX23 upright microscope.

 

The winning image for the Americas was captured by Ivan Radin (USA). A maximum projection of the deconvolved Z-stack of moss Physcomitrium patens protonemal cells. Cell walls (in cyan) were stained live with calcofluor white. Chloroplasts autofluorescence is in Fall LUT.

 

Honorable Mentions

Honorable mentions include Di Lu (China), Yujun Chen (USA), Mingyue Jia (China), David Maitland (UK), Layra Cintron-Rivera (USA), Igor Siwanowicz (USA) and Yayun Wang (China).

 

Image by Layra Cintron-Rivera (USA). The developing nervous system of an embryonic zebrafish. Specifically, the image is a color-coded projection of the axonal projections of a zebrafish fixed six days after fertilization.

 

The Image of the Year (IOTY) Award

The IOTY Award began in 2017 as Olympus’ Image of the Year European Life Science Light Microscopy Award with the aim to celebrate both the artistic and scientific value of microscopy images. Today, as the Evident IOTY, the competition stays true to this mission by encouraging people around the world to look at scientific images in a new way, appreciate their beauty, and share images with others.

Evident is a new wholly owned subsidiary of Olympus comprised of its former Life Science and Industrial divisions.