Search for content, post, videos
Being a scientist or an entrepreneur is hard enough. Doing both at the same time sounds like an Olympic sport. Swedish scientist and “serial entrepreneur” Dr. Mathias Uhlén, PhD., professor at KTH Royal Institute of Technology, though, makes it look easy. Not only has he founded more than 20 companies in recent years, but his research has generated more than 650 publications and he is now one of the most cited researchers in Sweden, with more than 8,000 citations last year. Uhlén’s work focuses on protein science, antibody engineering, engineering and precision medicine. One of his biggest projects over the past 18 years has been spearheading an international effort to create a Human Protein Atlas. The project involves mapping all the human proteins in cells, tissues and organs and making it readily available to a wide audience.     A diverse portfolio of companies Part of the incentive for founding so many companies, according to Mathias Uhlén, was to provide the most expedient way to transform ideas into applications. “In the early phase of my carrier, we licensed many innovations to large companies, but since the 1990s, the preferred route has been to spin-out companies and develop the innovation inside a start-up company,” he says. Uhlén’s diverse portfolio includes companies such as Biotage, which offers workflow solutions and products to customers in drug discovery and development, analytical testing and water and environmental testing to reduce their impact on the globe, and Alligator Bioscience, a research-based biotechnology company developing antibody-based pharmaceuticals for cancer treatment. He has also founded Abclon, a South Korean company listed on the South Korean stock exchange COSDAQ. Alligator and Abclon both specialize in the development of tumor-directed immunotherapies.   The best of both worlds Over the past decade or so, Uhlén has started an average of one company per year, and expects to continue that pace for a few more years. “I very much enjoy being in both worlds, the academic world, driven by curiosity and full of intellectual challenges, and the business world, driven by courage and full of operational challenges,” Uhlén explains. “However, to do both of these properly, one has to work hard and it is important to foster an environment of efficient and constructive meetings and decisions. As a leader, you need to understand the details to make the right strategic decisions when leading science-driven projects.” “I very much enjoy being in both worlds, the academic world, driven by curiosity and full of intellectual challenges, and the business world, driven by courage and full of operational challenges.” A good day, he says, is one full of discussion with talented co-workers. “Actually, this happens every working day and this makes it easy to wake up in the morning.” His passion to understand how humans work in a holistic manner drives
Already a subscriber Login

You have read all your free articles, to continue reading subscribe to read the rest of this content.