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North Zealand University Hosiptal, Ferring collaborate

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Ferring Pharmaceuticals and North Zealand University Hospital (Nordsjællands Hospital) have formally inaugurated a multi-year collaboration aimed at transforming the way in which patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) manage their condition and receive medical care.

During the event, held at North Zealand University Hospital in Copenhagen, local doctors, researchers and IBD patients learned more about the eHealth-based programme and its potential to increase adherence to treatment and reduce time-to-remission.

“We have already implemented web-ward rounds in the eHealth out-patient clinic,” said Bente Ourø Rørth, Head of North Zealand University Hospital. “Our web-based application empowers patients to home-monitor, giving them the opportunity to detect a relapse sooner than in a standard care setting.”

The collaboration reflects Ferring’s long-term commitment to enhancing the quality of life and quality of care of IBD patients through the development of personalised, ‘beyond-the-pill’ solutions and innovative scientific research, including the exploration of the human microbiome.

Ferring’s collaboration with the hospital also evaluates the role of microbiota in IBD patient responses to different treatments in an eHealth setting. As the first test site, information and patient data generated from the programme will be used to refine the eHealth tool and provide more insights into treatment options before it is rolled out more widely.

“Research into the microbiome is changing our perspectives on health and disease, but there are still many factors that are not yet known or properly understood,” said Per Falk, Executive Vice President and Chief Scientific Officer, Ferring Pharmaceuticals. “Ferring is committing to advancing research in this area, with the ultimate goal of generating personalised treatment for IBD patients and early interventions for those at risk of developing the disease.”